Pierre Ferrand 10 Generations 1er Cru Cognac

£35.00
  • Pierre Ferrand 10 Generations 1er Cru Cognac
  • Pierre Ferrand 10 Generations 1er Cru Cognac

Pierre Ferrand 10 Generations 1er Cru Cognac

£35.00

AVAILABILITY: 9 in stock

Since 1630, in the heart of the vineyards of Cognac, 10 generations of Ferrands have passed down an abiding knowledge of the vine and of distillation. This Premier Cru de Cognac is a tribute to these men of character, for whom a great cognac was above all the fruit of patient work on a great terroir.

Living in the venerable mansion of her ancestors, Mademoiselle Henriette, the last direct descendant of this prestigious lineage, was, during her lifetime, the guardian of this precious memory. She chose to entrust it to us, and she is the inspiration for this superb blend. We named it “10  Générations.”

Grande Champagne Cognac, 10 Générations is only made with Ugni-Blanc grapes. Distilled slowly on fine lees, it is aged in French oak with 20% in Sauternes casks. With freshness, it is an opulent Cognac.

Spirit Cognac
Style Vanilla, Floral, Fresh, Fruity
Where's it from? France
Volume 50cl
ABV 46%
Pairing/Garnish As Preferred

Reviews

Customer Reviews

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Alistair Montgomery
A very Distinctive Cognac

As a Johnny-come-lately to the world of Cognac/Armagnac/Brandy, I am hesitant to write this review as it exposes my uncultured provenance.
In my limited experience in this field, I have generally found that as you progress up the slopes of quality one finds that the taste becomes much smoother and refined, losing any roughness and being more subtle in character possibly with you chasing to detect its original taste before it was refined. This spirit caught me by surprise as it was smooth but seemed to retain much of its nascent flavour without the roughness.
I enjoyed this very much, but on the first tasting, I had to check that I had not mistakenly poured myself a quality 12-year-old malt. No, it was a Cognac and a good one at that, but with its own distinctive air, being (to me) reminiscent of a malt. I suspect this is due to it having been aged in oak casks like our fine Malts are, with the added sweetness of the Sauterne wine that preceded it? I fear that experts will dismiss this impression of mine as naive.
However, for me, it does solve a dilemma that occasionally arises- when I cannot make up my mind if I wish to finish the evening off with a Brandy or a Malt. This will resolve my problem and I can enjoy the best of both worlds.